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Previous - April 9th, 2008 - Elisha Reavis

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2 Bar Ridge
(April 10th, 2008 - Superstition Mountains, Central Arizona)

After a chilly night on the banks of Reavis Creek, we found ice in our water bottles and frost inside our tents. We packed up and continued down-canyon past Reavis Ranch and picked up the Reavis Gap Trail climbing east out of the canyon toward 2 Bar Ridge.

2 Bar reminded me a lot of Oracle Ridge. This sucker was really long and we spent the better part of the day ducking and weaving along the ridge as it stretched north towards Roosevelt Lake on the Salt River.


2 Bar Ridge

Walking the 2Bar Ridge

The trail along 2 Bar was in rough condition and very rocky. Terry and I wasted a few breaths complaining to each other about how sore hour feet were, but we were rewarded with pretty nice views of Superstition wild country, and glimpses of the lakes strung along the Salt River flowing towards Phoenix. We also got to eyeball the next day’s challenge: the Four Peaks Wilderness area.

We collected and treated water at Walnut Spring. The water smelled like sulfur, but tasted great. Late in the afternoon, we finally left 2 Bar Ridge. The Trail turned down Cottonwood Canyon, which seemed poorly named - it is dry as a bone, and decorated with cactus and small bushes. A few miles down-canyon, however, a spring appeared seemingly out of nowhere and we spent the next mile or two walking through a beautiful grove of cottonwood, sycamore, and Arizona ash trees. It was an unexpectedly beautiful oasis, and once again I quietly thanked the Trail organizers for including such nice country in our itinerary.

Terry and I both started thinking and talking about the snack shop at the marina, which the trail passed near at Roosevelt Lake. Specifically, we were thinking about Snickers Bars, perhaps several Snickers Bars for each of us. Our hopes were cruelly dashed though, when we reached the marina at 5:30 in the afternoon only to discover it had closed at 4:00. Ouch!


Snickers Stash

Location of the "Snickers Stash"

We filled our empty water bottles using a water fountain at a nearby Ranger Station, and climbed back up the hillside overlooking both Roosevelt Lake and the Snickers Bars inside the marina. Our camp was on a small bench cut into a steep hillside. We prepared another meal in the dark, and fell into our sleeping bags.

We covered 21 miles that day.


Ringneck Snake

Ringneck Snake

-Dave Baker

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Next - April 11th, 2008 - Leaving the Trail

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